Sail Transport

Sail Transport

Building the Vermont Sail Freight Project


How a group of farmers, high school students, and community
volunteers are launching a little ship with a big message

Imagine boarding a flat-bottomed sailing barge for a 300-mile voyage from the shores of Lake Champlain to New York harbor. The hold is laden with twelve tons of locally produced wheat, flour, dry beans, maple syrup, apples, cabbages, and hard cider. This is not a historic re-enactment. This is the future!

Culture Change's changes - memo from Jan Lundberg

Sailing wine Holland-Denmark
Sailing wine Holland-Denmark

Here's the good word for you on the progression of Culture Change: Our work is zeroing in on an historic contribution to global infrastructure change. I believe you'll have a clear idea on why you should support it, if you don't already. (You can do it by here: donating here)

You recall how we saved healthy land with our campaign for a road building moratorium for over a decade, and educated the public. In the past few years you've noticed our growing emphasis on sail transport.

Sail Transport Movement Enters U.S. Mainstream: Eco-Ships And Buying Truly Green Coffee Today


The last month has seen exciting U.S. sail-transport developments. Three encouraging events indicate that the nation may no longer be falling behind Europe in nurturing a critical form of renewable energy. In northern Europe at least four well-established players are operating on a significant scale, and preparing to build more ships. Previous reports this summer on SailTransportNetwork.com have discussed these entities' exciting voyages and plans for new vessels.

The rise of sail transport for a different world economy

windmills outside Copenhagen
windmills outside Copenhagen

Reflections on a successful delivery of 8,000 bottles of wine, Holland to Denmark

At this writing, the Tres Hombres schooner-brig is just reaching the Netherlands, on its way back from Copenhagen. I wish I had taken the round trip and remained with my able crew mates, but I had to keep to my sail-transport research schedule by returning to the Mediterranean.

Sailing 8,000 bottles of wine to Copenhagen on the brigantine Tres Hombres of Holland


Fair Transport is the world's foremost sail cargo company. Its 32-meter ship, the Tres Hombres, has pulled off many a voyage in the past few years to bring rum, cacao and other goods from the Caribbean to northern Europe. Shorter runs have involved France, the UK, Denmark, and the Netherlands.

The solid, strong brigantine vessel's home is Den Helder, the naval/ship-building/museum port first envisioned by Napoleon. Now the ship is bound for Copenhagen where a visionary buyer will capitalize on the "green" market for carbon-emission-free wine.

Mosquito Fleet Sustainable Shipping - Olympia Schooner Company interview


Hoyle Hodges founded the new Olympia Schooner Company in the Puget Sound. This year it has instituted delivery of fresh produce as part of a business plan to at least break even with sailing cargo and eventually passengers. The company began as the Mosquito Fleet Sustainable Shipping project at Evergreen State College where Hoyle studied.

When we saw his video here at Sail Transport Network central in June, we were inspired to learn more. Here's the interview we conducted:

Culture Change is unique / Update on Sail Transport Network

In the interests of keeping the show on the road and the doors open, we need you as a supportive reader to help Culture Change cover basic costs in February. Here's why:

At Culture Change we aren't giving our readers and supporters a part-time, share-our-feelings service. No, we are full-time activists living a low-consumptive, engaged lifestyle. Cutting-edge projects have been our hallmark: Pedal Power Produce, banning plastic bags, depaving, initiating or participating in protests, the Sail Transport Network (STN), multi-media materials and events, arts, networking nonstop, and more --

South Pacific Islanders Revive Sail Power with Traditional Fleet on Tour


On April 19, 2011, five 60-foot boats left Auckland, New Zealand to set off on a year's voyage. Stops have included a sacred Polynesian homeland known as Hawaii, the end of one of the longer legs of a round-the-Pacific tour. A sixth boat had joined at Cook Islands, and a seventh in Tahiti. The crews represent the biggest traditional transport and exchange of Polynesian islanders in modern times.

The nearly identical boats are traditional but modern canoes, a catamaran rig called a waka (or vaka

Sail Transport Network is Unfurling


A sail transport revival is afoot and afloat around the world. As the cheap, easy crude oil has mostly been extracted from the Earth and spewed into the sky and water, the desirability and economics of sail power get stronger.

Sail Transport Network (STN) is an open project for almost anyone to participate in. Most of the inhabited world is coastal or on rivers. STN was put forward originally by Culture Change in 1999. We sail-transport activists envision linking coastal communities, islands, and river communities together sustainably --

Floating Hostels to the Rescue - for Homeless Too


I was discussing with a salty old colleague the possibilities of Sail Transport Network here in Portland, Oregon. It's not the perfect environment for all-wind power, but there are ways of greatly reducing petroleum for trade and transport over land and water now, before petrocollapse. One idea that relates to sail power and community-building is to help the homeless population while enhancing the whole public good.

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